TBT: My Year 4 Teaching Portfolio

I have recently been reflecting on what it takes to be a great – not just good – teacher. My professional experience includes teaching students from Year 3 all the way to, ahem, those over fifty. During the years before I embarked upon my PhD studies, I was a primary school teacher in one of Pakistan’s leading schools. In my current nostalgic frame of mind, I thought it would be appropriate to write a blog post about the ethos which I endeavoured to inculcate in my students through the visuals that surrounded them in their classroom. So I write below about some of the displays and activities that I initiated during my unforgettable and memorable time as a Year 4 teacher at the Karachi Grammar School.

Keys to Success: motivational prompts about positive social skills and good habits

Concept behind the display:

The Keys to Success were displayed prominently above the blackboard at the front of the class. This was in the children’s direct line of sight for main classroom instruction so as to ensure constant and subliminal reinforcement. The Keys included:

  1. Listen Actively
  2. Respect Everyone
  3. Ask Questions
  4. Do Neat Work
  5. Read Books
  6. Be Punctual
  7. Be Responsible
  8. Do Your Homework

Reading Garden:  developing and encouraging children’s creative and literary skills

reading garden.jpg

source: personal image (click on image to open full size in a separate window)

Concept behind the display:

Every week each child would borrow four books from the library:

  1. A fiction book
  2. A magazine
  3. A non-fiction book
  4. An Urdu (national language) book

To encourage the children to read, they would then make a flower, or any garden item, colour it and inside it, write the name of the book they enjoyed best that particular week. This way other children were encouraged to review their classmates favourite books and borrow the books to read for themselves.

Alongside this display, there was a list of reasons why particular books are chosen and enjoyed, that the class came up with together. This list included things such as colourful pictures, interesting characters and so on,  and was constantly being added to during the term. As a result of this display activity, children were exposed to a variety of authors and genres of books.

House Points: an eye-catching, child-friendly inspirational display

Concept behind the display:

house points

source: personal image (click on image to open full size in a separate window)

Each child in the classroom was assigned a House to which they belong. House Points were awarded to children on an on-going basis throughout the week for classwork, homework, behaviour, personal presentation (for example, neat and tidy appearances, and wearing the correct school uniform), following school rules and so on.

Each day as children would have to go out of the classroom, they would line up Housewise. According to the positions of the markers on each House’s ladder, the children were then requested to move out of the classroom, usually with members of the House with the most points leading the group.

This display was located in a prominent place in the class and children were encouraged to put up their House points themselves. Each House had one member (who was appointed on a rotational basis from another House) responsible to ensure the correct tallying of points.

As a result of this display activity, the children were greatly motivated to behave well, produce their best work and work together as a team (members of a common House group). I found this display a particularly useful tool that the children used to encourage each other.

Notice Board at Class Front: reinforcing learning outcomes, important spellings and conceptsnotice board

Concept behind the display:

The position of the display board was right next to the main blackboard. Therefore, it was in the children’s frequent line of sight. I took advantage of the board position to put up a whiteboard on which I would write the main learning outcomes for numeracy and literacy for every lesson.

This was advantageous because I would review these learning outcomes with the children after each lesson and a number of times, the children themselves would in fact add some more of the learning outcomes that they perceived they achieved from the lesson! Once this started happening, I realised how essential this strategy was and how much it added to the children’s understanding of the practical outcomes of each lesson.

Additionally, the display also had a spelling list of words for each week, alongwith a mathematical word of the week and number of the week, so the children were constantly able to review them.

The display border consisted of a collection of flowers, each containing the name of every member of the class, which the children loved!

Interactive Train (at the bottom of the display): reinforcing learning outcomes and making cross-curricular connections

Concept behind the display:

Positioned in an easily accessible place, I made a train with a number of carriages. Each carriage had a ‘compartment’ within which slips of paper could be inserted as per the respective labels on each carriage. As illustrated above, there was a little container pinned to the board near the carriage which held slips of paper which children could pick up and insert into the relevant carriage.

For example, for the topic ‘Improving the Environment’, the carriages had various labels such as, ‘how litter harms the environment’, ‘why recycling is important’, ‘how we can save energy’, and so on. As the topic progressed, children were able to pick up slips of paper (the opportunity was usually given as a reward for neat work, good behaviour, etc) on which I had pre-printed phrases such as, ‘plastic bags can destroy animal habitats’, ‘we can conserve our resources’, ‘we should carpool’, and so on.

Nearby was also a notice asking children if they could think of some more of their own examples to put into the appropriate carriages and a number of blank slips were provided for the children to write on.

I adapted this display for Mathematics as well, during the topics revieweing multiplication and division in particular. Each carriage was assigned a random number and various sums were made up with the blanks in any place for children to insert in the correct carriage, for instance: ‘5 x _ = 45’, ‘35 ÷ 7 = _’

Character Building: promoting good habits, health, hygiene and school spirit

Concept behind the display:

 

character bulding

source: personal image (click on image to open full size in a separate window)

As the children would eat their snacks inside the classroom three times a week, before going outside to play, I utilised the opportunity whilst supervising them to discuss positive character building habits, such as the importance of saying ‘please ‘ and ‘thank you’, washing hands before and after eating and especially after entering the house, and so on. Usually I would try to link the discussion with a Science or Geography current topic, such as the environment, or the human body, or relate it to a character in a story that the children would be reading.

I would also regularly review the School Song with the children because I believe it is very important to inculcate a proper understanding of the words so that the children realise the very principles and backbone on which their school was founded and strive to live up to them.

The good habits and values talked about during these discussions were also the basis for a number of rewards given out during school time, for instance, ‘Sarah shared her colouring pencils with Adam.’ (based on the principle  of sharing with each other). Rewards would be in the form of Housepoints, certificates, a chance to take home Sylvester (the class mascot) and so on.

Our Pledges: personal pledges by each student

 Concept behind the display:

pledges

source: personal image (click on image to open full size in a separate window)

On the first day of each term, I conducted an exercise whereby we would discuss the school rules, come up with our own classroom rules, and talk about what we each expected, as a teacher and students respectively, from the classroom and associated learning.

Following this, the students and myself then each wrote down our ‘pledge’ of thought, behaviour or learning for the coming term. We coloured our pledges which were then mounted and displayed in a prominent place in the classroom.

Students’ pledges included, ‘I pledge to write in cursive handwriting’, ‘I pledge to improve my vocabulary’ and ‘I pledge that I will not run in the corridors’.

As a teacher, whenever the opportunity arose during the term, I would constantly refer children to the pledges they made. This served to keep them focused.

At the end of the term, children were returned their pledges along with a short note of appreciation from me on the back of each pledge encouraging them to strive for even more the following term.

The Classroom Layout: colourful, interactive, child-friendly, organised and conducive to learning

Concept behind the layout:

layout

source: personal image (click on image to open full size in a separate window)

It is common knowledge that the more child-friendly and colourful a learning environment is, the more conducive for learning it will ultimately be. Keeping that in mind, I arranged my classroom in such a way that as children were divided into various groups they were able to experience a positive ambience all around.

A number of the displays were interactive and required some form of input from the children, whether their writing on the boards in a given space, or placing slips or paper in the correct strategic places and so on.

The students’ work in the form of worksheets, posters (for instance those such as movie posters advertising movies based on their favourite books), bookmarks they made, and artwork was also displayed at all times, as seeing their work up on display was a great motivating factor.

Children’s cubbyholes and trolley baskets (for them to organise the books they required at their tables for various lessons) were also placed in easily accessible areas with clear labelling of each and every area and compartment.

Poetry Corner

Concept behind the display:

In my classroom I laid great emphasis on having a poetry corner. The objective of which was to enable children to compare and contrast poems on similar themes, particularly their form and language, discuss personal responses and preferences, find out more about popular authors and poets, and use this information to move onto more books by favourite writers.

The display also served as a tool to encourage children to understand the use of figurative language in poetry and prose, compare poetic phrasing with narrative and descriptive examples, reading the poems aloud, identify various patterns of rhyme and verse, read the poems aloud, locate the use of similes, making comparisons and identifying familiar features of the works of particular poets, to write poems of their own keeping all the explored factors in mind, and so on.

A key aspect of the display was the visual appeal of the poems. I endeavoured to show children how enjoyable poetry can be, particularly when combined with artistic creativity.

The perennial display was also a key build-up to the annual intra-school poetry recital competition, in which there were class and solo performances.

Sylvester: motivating and inspiring students to behave well, and inculcate within them a sense of responsibility

sylvester

source: personal image (click on image to open full size in a separate window)

Concept behind the activity:

I instituted a class mascot ‘Sylvester’, a stuffed toy replica of the famous character from the Looney Tunes series. The concept behind Sylvester was that he would go home every weekend with a member of the class who behaved well or performed outstandingly in a particular endeavour.

The student whom he went home with would have to look after Sylvester and ensure that he had an ‘enjoyable time’ with them whilst ensuring that no harm came to him and he was kept safely. They would then have to write an entry for that weekend in Sylvesters journal, pretending to be him.

Indeed, his own introduction in the journal was: “Hello! I’m Sylvester. This is my journal. It is all about my life and the exciting time I have during my travels. Every weekend I go home with a different member of Class IVG2. All my splendid moments are jotted down in this journal. Join me in my merry adventures with the students of IVG2.”

Children absolutely adored Sylvester and constantly referred to him as another member of the class. I would also use him as a positive example, inspiring their imaginations, for example by saying, ‘What do you think Sylvester would do in such a situation?’

Certificates: reinforcing and rewarding positive behaviour

proud of me certificates

source: personal image (click on image to open full size in a separate window)

Concept behind the activity: 

Every week on a Friday, a child would be presented with a certificate rewarding a particular aspect of their behaviour. Reasons were varied and included things such as, ‘My teacher is proud of me because I…

  • cared for the environment
  • completed my class work  accurately and neatly
  • listened carefully and followed directions
  • remembered to use kind words
  • was a kind and willing helper of my classmates
  • made commendable contributions to class discussions
  • asked questions when unsure
  • was sensitive to others’ feelings
  • offered to help without being asked
  • demonstrated a positive attitude towards a problem
  • read voraciously during the holidays

The certificates were laminated and presented in a mini-ceremony just before the close of school for each weekend.

Bookmarks: a memento of their time with me and encouragement to continue reading

bookmark

source: personal image (click on image to open full size in a separate window)

Concept behind the activity:

At the end of each school year, once exams were over, and children had some free time, I would give each child a bookmark to colour. On the reverse side of it, they could draw their favourite character from any book that they had read, write the name of the book, and the year. Before the last day of school, I laminated all the bookmarks, and presented them to the pupils with their report cards to take home as a memento of their time in my Year 4 class.

 

 

Note of Appreciation: students’ application of taught concepts which make all my effort truly worthwhile!  

As a teacher, I receive a number of sweet notes from my students not just during their time with me, but long after too. The notes are often full of love and appreciation. A number of them often reflect some particular skill or strategy that the student has recently been taught by me.

One such example are these notes from Year 4 (Key Stage 2) students. At the time, I had just taught the children how to explore and write poems based on different styles and structures. In these particular poems to me, what is most pleasing to note is students’ application of concepts taught in the classroom and their extended learning from it.

These notes are just one example why the teaching profession is so immensely rewarding and joyous and why I return to it time and time again. Teachers come in all forms, for all facets of life: academic, personal and professional. Do you consider yourself a teacher too? Or do you know of a great teacher? I’d love to hear from you, so do please share your experiences in the comments below.

Saneeya Qureshi © 2017

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