I’m an impostor

A dear friend emailed me this Buzzfeed article ‘13 Charts That Will Make Total Sense To People With Impostor Syndrome‘, saying that she was pretty sure I that had stated or continually state at least one of the thoughts in the article on an almost-daily basis to her.

I must admit, that although I giggled at the charts; each and every single one resonated with me. Apparently, I suffer from Impostor Syndrome. Admittedly, I am in esteemed company, as the actress and UN ambassador Emma Watson has confessed that she feels like an impostor, as have Sheryl Sandberg, Judge Sonia Sotomayor, Kate Winslet and Maya Angelou.

For a number of years, many around me, including my family, my supervisor during my PhD studies, my current boss, and recently and more vociferously, a close friend and colleague, have urged me to consciously overcome this syndrome, because it’s doing me no favours, particularly as I make ground in my professional achievements on an international level.

A TED Talk by Amy Cuddy (suggested by said friend) has been particularly inspiring and I watch it at least once a month, fervently trying to “fake it, till I become it”. I also pull similarly inspirational articles via my Feedly RSS reader, including this recent piece in the Telegraph, ‘Imposter syndrome: Why do so many women feel like frauds?

The path to changing my mindset is no mean feat; after all, I am someone whose all-time favourite childhood poem is ‘I’m Nobody! Who are You?’ by Emily Dickinson. I shall shamelessly take this opportunity to share the poem below (and use this blog post as an excuse to recite it as I did for my prize-winning School Elocution Competition Performance way back when life was so much simpler):

 

I’m nobody! Who are you?
Are you nobody, too?
Then there’s a pair of us -don’t tell!
They’d banish us, you know.

How dreary to be somebody!
How public, like a frog
To tell your name the livelong day
To an admiring bog!

by Emily Dickinson (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886)

I feel it obligatory to end this blog post on a hopeful note. Caltech has a list of positive behaviours to reinforce the sense of acknowledging one’s achievements, and moving on. My favourites though, and ones that I earnestly try to incorporate, are from a Forbes article:

  1. Focus on the value you bring; not on attaining perfection.
  2. Own your successes. You didn’t get lucky by chance. 
  3. Cease comparisons. They’re an act violence against oneself. 
  4. Hold firm to ambition.  Risk outright exposure!

What about you? Do you, or anyone you know suffer from Impostor Syndrome? What’s your take on it? I’d love to know, so do please leave a comment below.

Saneeya Qureshi © 2016

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